Constantine Hering

Section 7

Medicines From The Vegetable Kingdom

Among medicines belonging to the vegetable kingdom, those which may be compared as being nearly allied, are:

  • Anac. and Rhus.
  • Bryon. and Coloc.
  • Ind. and Tong.
  • Op. and Chelid.
  • Spig. and Menyanth.
  • Viol. od. and Jac.
  • Thuya. and Sabin.
  • Coff., Ipec., Chin.
  • Colch., Verat., Sabad.
  • Euphr., Dig., Grat.
  • Lauroc., Prun. sp., Amyg. am.
  • Led., Rhod., Nux vom., Ign., Oleand.
  • Arn., Cham., Cin., Leont.
  • Asa., Cic., Con., Aet., Phell.
  • Bell., Caps., Hyosc., Stram., Tab., Verb.
  • Acon., Clem., Hell., Puls., Staph., Ran. bulb., and Sol.

The cryptogamous plants, Agar. musc., Bov., Lycop., are too remote from each other – and yet their symptoms are much more similar than those of the more nearly related families of Solaneae and Ranunculaceae. Sec. can only be judged from from the cures it has effected – the symptoms of it derived from epidemic diseases are not to be relied on.

It is worthy of observation that the differences of those substances which are allied in their origin lie principally in the conditions of the symptoms; whereas those substances nearly connected by the similarity of their symptoms alone, agree merely in single departments of symptoms, but in others have quite a different character and seat.

Families of substances that are related only in their symptom may be formed from such medicines as may be employed with advantage in succession – or which serve as antidotes to each other

Families of substances that are related only in their symptom may be formed from such medicines as may be employed with advantage in succession – or which serve as antidotes to each other.

In the present state of homeopathic literature, the formation of such families is a very hazardous experiment. But they are of much greater practical value than those formed from their natural affinity.

It is perfectly evident that substances that have a similar origin must produce many similar symptoms. Our business should be to search for the differences, in order to avoid confusion.

When, however, minerals, plants, and animals, widely different from each other, produce similar groups of symptoms, there must be some deeper reason for this. It must indicate the similarity of the medicinal to the natural diseases.

Such allied medicines are in general the best antidotes of each other. However – as must happen from the rules laid down above – among the metals that form several families, there are antidotes which are never found among those that are nearly connected, but always among those that are widely separated.

Thus it follows that Sel., Ars., and Am.; Plat. and Argent.; Stan. Plumb., Zinc. and Nic.; Ferr. and Mang. do not antidote each other. But the metals Plumb. and Plat.; Ferr. and Ars.; Am. and Merc. do.

Among plants there must be antidotes in each family, and perhaps in each genus. There are, indeed separate parts in every plant and animal, which seems to have a power of neutralizing the effects of the others.

Other homeopathic writers have pointed out a close connection between the two naturally allied substances Nux. and Ign., on the one hand, and the symptomatically allied Puls. – to which may be added Cham., Coff., and Caps. We may, I think, also reckon Ambr. among these.

Another family is Ars., Verat., Ipec., Asar., to which we may add Ferr. and Chin.; perhaps also Staph., and Ac. sulph..

Sulph., Calc., and Lyc. are well known as doing well in succession ‐ to which may be joined Led., and in another point of view, Therid.

One who is acquainted with a large number of medicines in the above manner, can compare every medicine with every other in a very short time

One of the most remarkable and beautiful families is Hep., Merc., bell., and Lach. Between these and those allied to Arsen., may be placed Phos. ac. and Carb. veg., and those related to them, as alsoCupr., and on another account Aur.

Anyone who has thoroughly made himself master of two or three families, and then from time to time makes a comparison between two remedies which appear to him to be related — and between which he has frequently needed to make a most accurate choice in practice, as for instance, Sulph. and Ferr.; Phos. and Caust.; Ars. and Carb. v.; Bell. and Bry.; Bry. and Rhus.; Rhus. and Dulc., etc. — this homeopathic doctor gradually obtains such an extensive basis of knowledge that all the rest of the remedies are acquired without difficulty.

If a crystal of salt is suspended in a saturated solution of the same salt, the most beautiful crystals collect upon it.

So, one who is acquainted with a large number of medicines in the above manner, can thereafter compare every medicine with every other in a very short time – and without many quires of paper.

This must happen before our materia medica, which ought to belong to the natural sciences, can be looked upon as one of them.

Modernized translation by WholeHealthNow © 2004