Guide to the Homeopathic Treatment of Beef and Dairy Cattle

Guide to the Homeopathic Treatment of Beef and Dairy Cattle

  • Christopher Day, Vet. MB, MRCVS, VetFFHom

DAY105

$29.95

Overview

The information is clearly stated enabling the reader to apply homeopathy to their livestock problems.

All 141 medicines mentioned in the book are listed alphabetically, and a suggested starter list of thirty homoeopathic medicines is also included, along with a glossary of terms.

UK
141 pp pb
ISBN 0-906584-37-X
Beaconsfield Publishers, Ltd.

Details

One hundred and forty-one homeopathic remedies of value in cattle are described, with particular symptoms and signs that indicate their use.

The therapeutic index covers a good array of conditions offering sound treatment options.

From the Book

  • Can mastitis be cured without antibiotics?
  • Can ringworm be cleared inexpensively?
  • Is it true that New Forest Eye can be treated - and prevented -by a few drops of medicine in the drinking water trough?
  • Is it also true that homoeopathic treatment is free of harmful side effects and leaves no residues in an animal's body?

This book is a guide for the farmer and smallholder. It explains the thinking behind the homoeopathic treatment of disease and describes how it may be used on an everyday basis in the care of cattle, both as individual animals and in a group.

One hundred and forty-one homoeopathic remedies of value in cattle are then briefly described, with reference to the particular symptoms and signs for which their use may be indicated. This is followed by a wide-ranging A-Z of disease syndromes, with pointers to the remedies that are likely to be effective in each situation.

The author emphasizes that animal welfare is of overriding importance, and that good nutrition and management provide a necessary framework for the use of homoeopathy no less than for any other therapy.

He recognizes the importance of conventional veterinary medicine where the need for palliation is great, and does not discourage the reader from combining it with homoeopathic medicine if the well being of an animal would be best served in this way.

Throughout the book he highlights those circumstances where qualified veterinary help must always be sought.

Contents

1. About Homeopathy -- 1-4

2. About Farming -- 5-8

3. About Disease --- 9-16
The Meaning of Signs and Symptoms -- 9
Possible Consequences of Disease Challenge -- 10-11
Diet -- 12
Housing -- 13
Grazing Management -- 14
Breeding -- 14
Productivity -- 15
Machine Milking -- 15
Calf Marketing and Rearing -- 15

4. Why Use Homeopathy -- 17-23
No Side Effects -- 17
No Requirement for Laboratory Animal Experiments -- 17
No Residues in Tissue or Milk -- 17
Cost -- 18
Welfare -- 18
No Real Dependence on Diagnosis in the Conventional Sense -- 18
It is Non-Suppressive -- 18-20
Efficacy -- 21
Summary -- 21-23

Ch.5 - Homeopathy: The Choices presented --24-33
Constitutional Prescribing -- 25-27
Local or Presenting Symptom Prescribing -- 28
The Pathological Method -- 28
The Organ Level -- 29
Facultative/ Regulatory/ Detoxifying Prescribing -- 29
Historical and Specific Prescribing -- 29
Prevention -- 30-31
Treatment Strategy -- 32
Side Effects -- 32
Summary -- 33

Ch.6 - How to Use the Remedies -- 34-39
Storage -- 36
Potency -- 36-37
Frequency and Duration -- 38
Dosage -- 38
Availability -- 38
Summary -- 39

Ch.7 - Materia Medica -- 40-71

Ch.8 - A-Z of Disease Syndromes -- 72-99
Abomasum, Displaced (see Acetonemia) -- 74
Abortion, Induction of -- 74
Abortion, Mental ill-effects from -- 74
Abortion, Prevention of -- 74
Abscess -- 74
Acetonemia -- 74
Actinobacillosis -- 74
Actinomycosis -- 75
Afterbirth (see Placenta) -- 75
Arthritis -- 75
Bleeding (see Hemorrhage) -- 75
Bloat -- 75
Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (BVD) -- 76
Caesaren (see Injury, surgical) -- 76
Calf-Bed (see Prolapse) -- 76
Calf Diphtheria -- 76
Calving Difficulty (see Dystocia) -- 76
Castration (see Injury, surgical) -- 76
Cellultis -- 76
Cerebro-Cortical Necrosis (CCN) -- 76
Chill -- 77
Cleansing (see Placenta) -- 77
Coccidiosis -- 77
Colibacillosis (see Placenta) -- 77
Coccidiosis -- 77
Colibacillosis (see Scour; Septicemia) -- 77
Colic -- 77
Collapse -- 77
Conjunctivitis (see New Forest Eye) -- 78
Constipation -- 78
Convulsions -- 78
Corn (see Interdigital Hyperplasia) -- 78
Cough (see Husk; Pneumonia) -- 78
Cow Flu (see Winter Scour) -- 78
Cowpox -- 78
Dehorning/ Disbudding (see Injury, Surgical) -- 78
Dehydration -- 79
Dentition (see Teeth) -- 79
Diarrhoea/ Dysentery (see Scour) -- 79
Diphtheria (see Calf Diphtheria) -- 79
Displaced Abomasum (see Actonemia) -- 79
Downer Cow (see Recumbency) -- 79
Dysentery -- 79
Dystocia -- 79
Fascioliasis (see Liver Fluke) -- 79
Feet -- 79
Fever -- 80
Fistula/ Sinus -- 81
Flu (see Winter Scour) -- 81
Fluke (see Liver Fluke) -- 81
Fly Nuisance (see Chapter 10) -- 81
Fog Fever -- 81
Foul-in-the-Foot (see Feet) -- 81
Grass Staggers/ Grass Tetany (see Hypomagnesemia) -- 81
Hemorrhage -- 81
Helminthiasis (see Worms) -- 82
Hoose (see Husk) -- 82
Husk -- 82
Hypocalcemia (Milk Fever) -- 82
Hypomagnesemia (Staggers) -- 83
Impotence and Male Sterility --83
Infectiuos Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR) -- 83
Infertility -- 83
Injury -- 84
Interdigital Hyperplasia (Corn) -- 85
Intertrigo -- 85
Jaundice -- 85
Joint III/ Navel III -- 85
Keratoconjunctivitis (see New Forest Eye) -- 85
Ketosis (see Acetonemia) -- 85
Kidneys -- 85
Lameness (see Arthritis; Feet; Injury; Laminitis) -- 86
Laminitis -- 86
Laparotomy (see Injury, surgical) -- 86
Leptospirosis -- 86
Libido (see Impotence) -- 87
Listeriosis -- 87
Liver -- 87
Liver Fluke -- 87
Low (see Feet) -- 88
Luer (see Feet) -- 88
Lumpy Jaw (see Actinomycosis) -- 88
Lungworm (see Husk) -- 88
Mammillitis -- 88
Mastitis -- 88
Mental Problems (see Chapter 9) -- 89
Metritis (and Endometritis) -- 89
Milk -- 89
Milk Fever (see Hypocalcamemia) -- 90
Milk Scour (see Scour) -- 90
Mucosal Disease -- 90
Navel Ill (see Joint Ill) -- 90
New Forest Eye -- 90
Nymphomania (see Infertility) -- 91
Oedema of the Udder -- 91
Orchitis (Inflammation of the Testicles) -- 91
Osteomyelitis -- 91
Ostertagiasis (see worms) -- 91
Pain -- 91
Papillomatosis (Warts) -- 91
Parasitic Bronchitis (see Husk) -- 92
Parasitic Gastroenteritis (see Worms) -- 92
Peritonitis -- 92
Photosensitisation -- 92
Placenta, Retained (see also Metritis) --92
Pneumonia -- 93
Poisoning -- 93
Prolapse of Uterus or Vagina -- 93
Recumbency -- 94
Ringwomb -- 94
Ringworm -- 94
Rumenotomy (see Injury, surgical, Poisoning) -- 94
Salmonellosis -- 94
Scour -- 94
Septic Conditions -- 95
Septicemia -- 95
Shock -- 95
Slow Fever (see Acetonemia) -- 96
Staggers (see Hypomagnesemia) -- 96
Sterlity, Male (see Impotence) -- 96
Surgery (see Injury) -- 96
Synovitis -- 96
Teeth -- 96
Tetanus -- 96
Toxemia (see also Poisoning) -- 96
Transport Stress -- 97
Trauma (see Injury) -- 97
Twins, Debility from -- 97
Tympany (see Bloat) -- 97
Umbilicus (see Joint Ill/Navel Ill) -- 97
Urine Retention / Difficulty (see Injury, calving) -- 97
Uterus (see Metritis; Prolapse) -- 97
Vagina (see Prolapse) -- 97
Warts (see Papillomatosis) -- 97
Whites (see Metritis) -- 97
Winter Scour (or Cow Flu) -- 97
Wooden Tongue (see Actinobacillosis) -- 97
Womb (see Metritis, Prolapse) -- 98
Worms -- 98
Summary -- 98

Ch.9 - Health Problems -- 100-101
Anxiety in General -- 100
Excitability -- 100
Fears Being Alone or Separated from Group -- 100
Fears Contact or Touch -- 101
Effects of Fright -- 101
Effects of Grief (such as may occur at weaning in both dam and calf) -- 101
Milk Let-Down Problems -- 101
Mixing Stress -- 101
Pain (see Chapter 8) -- 101
Perinatal Problems (mis-mothering, failure to accept calf) -- 101
Shock -- 101
Transport Stress (Chapter 8) -- 101
Violent, Destructive Behaviour -- 101

Ch.10 - Animal Welfare on the Farm, and the Role of Homeopathy -- 102-108
Basic Conditions -- 102
Procedures -- 103
Handling and Transport -- 103
Illness or Accident -- 104
Pain and Distress -- 105
The Saving of Animals from Salvage -- 105
Breeding Considerations -- 106
Medicine, Management and Nutrition -- 106
Group Size -- 106
Fly Control -- 107
Summary -- 108

Ch.11- Management Factors in Mastitis Prevention -- 109-113
Environmental Spread -- 109
Cow-to-Cow Spread -- 110
Ways of Reducing Cow-to-Cow Spread -- 111-113

Appendix 1 - Selected Case Histories -- 114-117
Mastitis -- 114
New Forest Eye -- 115
Recumbency -- 115
Septic Arthritis -- 116-117

Appendix 2 - Clinical Trials and Data -- 118-121
Friesian Heifers - Dystocia -- 118-119
Friesian Cows - Mastitis -- 120
Holstein / Friesian Cows - Mastitis -- 121

A Suggested Remedy Starter List -- 122
Glossary -- 123-127
Personal Remedy Checklist -- 128-130
Further Reading -- 131
Some Useful Addresses -- 132-133
Subject Index -- 134-139
Remedy Index -- 140-141

Christopher Day

Christopher Day qualified as a vet from Cambridge University in 1972.

He worked first in a farm, equine and small animal practice in the Lancashire Pennines before joining and subsequently running his parents' mixed country practice in rural Oxfordshire.

Having encountered homoeopathic medicine at an early age he was keen to use it in practice, and by now homoeopathy and other holistic therapies have taken over his life.

He is Veterinary Dean of the Faculty of Homoeopathy, London, and a founder member and Honorary Secretary of the British Association of Homoeopathic Veterinary Surgeons.

He is also a founder member and the first President of the International Association for Veterinary Homoeopathy.

He has written numerous books and papers on natural veterinary medicine and travels worldwide to teach the subject, as well as to treat his farm and equine patients

Reviews

British Homoeopathic Journal
Volume 85, April 1996

Reviewed by John Saxton

This is a book which is not aimed primarily at homoeopaths but will nevertheless be of interest and some use to them, especially those at the start of their homoeopathic careers.

The author himself states at the opening of the preface that 'the aim of this book is to give farmers and smallholders a guide to treating with homoeopathic medicine the majority of illness in their individual animals.'

Within the parameters laid down, he is broadly successful.

The early chapters (1 to 6) are concerned with general considerations of homoeopathy within the broader holistic and welfare pictures, and how this relates to the practicalities of farming today.

Many may find the coverage lacking in depth in some areas, but the intended readership must be remembered. The individual chapters are both short and easy to read, ideally suited to a few quiet minutes either during or at the end of an otherwise busy day.

The basic message of each chapter is clear, and the reader is taken via a logical progression to the point where they can begin to apply homoeopathy to their stock problems.

This approach is to be welcomed, as too often we are met with the attitude that homoeopathy is only medicine that uses dilute natural substances, and hence can do no harm, but that the underlying principles are the same as in conventional medicine. There is enough in these early chapters to dispel that illusion.

Chapters 7 and 8 revert to the more usual format found in books designed primarily for the lay reader.

Chapter 7 is a materia medica of the medicines included in the book. It is of necessity brief and selective, but the author is the first to acknowledge its limitations and encourage reference to other works.

Chapter 8 lists most of the commoner syndromes known to the conventional school with suggestions as to treatment. Conventional terminology is used.

There would seem to be no practical alternative to this format if the section is to be of use as a quick reference, and the summaries at the end of each chapter draw the reader back to the holistic approach.

Chapter 9 is devoted to mental problems, and is very brief. There is considerable overlap with Chapter 8 and there seems to be no good reason why the two were separated.

Chapters 10 and 11 contain virtually no direct homoeopathy, although the contents are valid and valuable from the holistic viewpoint, offering good advice and the restatement of basic principles.

My heart always tends to sink when I see a chapter of case histories presented for the public. Too often these can be presented as the 'miracle cure phenomenon', playing to the Animal Hospital mentality.

Here my fears were groundless. Four cases, presented factually, each used to show an homoeopathic principle, make for a useful appendix.

A suggested starter list of thirty homoeopathic medicines and a glossary of terms which goes slightly beyond the text of the book are included. There is also a check-list of medicines which seems to me to be completely pointless.

The 141 medicines mentioned in the book are listed alphabetically, with a blank box against each name.

The reader is invited to tick the appropriate box as each remedy is acquired-a sort of homoeopathic 'I Spy'! A much more useful feature is the splitting of the index into two parts, medicines and other subjects.

The main gain here is to remove the medicines from the general index, thereby simplifying it by 141 entries. In the medicines index, the main entry is in bold type. However, as that reference is in every case in Chapter 7, it is in practice easier to go straight there.

But all this is to perhaps overstress the minor details of what is a worthwhile addition to the veterinary literature, with much to offer at several levels.